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Grammar books state that 'due to' should not be used as an adverbial phrase.

 

For example: Due to incubator malfunction, we ended the experiment.

 

The italicized phrase above functions as an adverb (it explains why), and therefore due to should not be used. You might ask why due to should not be used adverbially - hell if I know!

 

Grammar books would suggest the following revision: Because the incubator malfunctioned, we ended the experiment.

 

Grammar books suggest using due to after a 'to be' verb (when due to is therefore functioning as an adjective rather than an adverb).

 

For example: The termination of the experiment was due to incubator malfunction.

 

But note how use of due to creates a static, noun-based sentence:

Noun - 'to be' verb - due to - noun.

 

Better to avoid due to and use more active verbs, as below:

Because the incubator malfunctioned, we ended the experiment.

Because the incubator malfunctioned, the experiment was ended.

 

What about 'Due to the fact that the incubator malfunctioned, the experiment was ended'?

Avoid due to the fact that due to the fact that it is needlessly wordy and due to the fact that it sounds prefabricated.

Due to the successful explication of the phrase due to, this section will be considered complete.

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